Mac os time machine command line


How local snapshots use storage space

Says Apple:. When you enter Time Machine, a timeline appears on the right side of the screen. Each dated tick mark in the timeline is a backup, and each backup has a color when you move the pointer over it:. A bright red tick mark is a backup that can be restored now, either from a local snapshot or your backup drive.

How to Stop Your Mac Sleeping While Time Machine is Running

A dimmed red tick mark is a backup that can be restored from your backup drive after that drive becomes available. Until then, the stack of windows on the screen shows a blank window for that backup. A dimmed pink tick mark is a backup that can be restored from your backup drive after that drive becomes available.

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Feb 16 ' Related Posts: macOS app: BackupLoupe examines Time Machine backups How to not accidentally delete all your rsync backups Apple says don't use Time Machine if you take lots of photos Selective pruning of old rsync backups Create Time Machine-like backups via rsync Change shell scripts based on where they run. Great tip! Says Apple: When you enter Time Machine, a timeline appears on the right side of the screen.

Each dated tick mark in the timeline is a backup, and each backup has a color when you move the pointer over it: OS X Yosemite or later A bright red tick mark is a backup that can be restored now, either from a local snapshot or your backup drive. OS X Mavericks or earlier A gray tick mark is a backup that can be restored now from a local snapshot. Time Machine is the backup method of choice for many Mac users.

Mac Time Machine Backup Optimization

But there are a couple of things missing from Time Machine: information about what's going on during a backup, and information about the current state of the backups. Most of us believe our backups are in good shape. We also tend to blithely assume that we have sufficient drive space for the next backup. After all, one of the things Time Machine does is remove old backups if it needs room for new ones.

So, there shouldn't be any problems, or at least, we hope not. Time Machine is simple to set up.

Restore Time Machine backup from Terminal - Franklin

Even better, it's transparent to use. We know that if disaster strikes and we lose a drive's worth of data, we won't hear anyone say that the last time they ran a backup was a week ago.


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With Time Machine, the last backup probably ran no more than an hour ago. But this reliance on an automated process that delivers very little usable feedback can be a concern if you support two or more Macs and you need the ability to plan for such things as when to increase backup storage size.

One feature that Time Machine users commonly ask for is information about drift, which is a measure of the change that occurs between one backup and the next. Drift tells you how much data has been added to your backup, as well as how much data has been removed.

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There are many reasons to want to know the drift rate. If you measure drift and discover that you're adding large chunks of data each time you run a backup, you may want to plan on a larger backup drive in the near future. Likewise, if you notice that you're removing copious amounts of data with every backup, you may want to determine whether you're saving enough history in your backups. Once again, it may be time to buy a larger backup drive. You can also use drift information to help you decide whether you need to upgrade a backup drive at all. You may discover that your current backup drive is much larger than you need, now or in the foreseeable future.

pierreducalvet.ca/16550.php If the added data rate per Time Machine slice is low, you have less reason to consider an upgrade than if the added data rate is high. Time Machine's user interface doesn't include a method for measuring drift. You could measure the amount of data stored on your backup drive before Time Machine runs and then again after it runs. But that only reveals the total amount of change, not how much data was added and how much data was removed.

Thankfully, like many of Apple's system utilities, Time Machine is built on top of a command line utility that has the capability to provide all the information we need to measure drift. This command line utility is one of our favorite apps: Terminal. Your Mac will start analyzing your Time Machine backups to produce the drift numbers we need, specifically, the amount of data added, the amount of data removed, and the amount changed.

The numbers will be provided for each slice or increment that your Time Machine stores.

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These numbers will be different for everyone because they're based on how much data you store in the backup, and how long you've been using Time Machine. Typical slice sizes are per day, per week, or per month. It can take some time to run the drift calculations, depending on the size of your backup drive, so be patient. When the calculations are finished, Terminal will display drift data for each Time Machine backup slice in the following format:.

mac os time machine command line Mac os time machine command line
mac os time machine command line Mac os time machine command line
mac os time machine command line Mac os time machine command line
mac os time machine command line Mac os time machine command line
mac os time machine command line Mac os time machine command line
mac os time machine command line Mac os time machine command line

Related mac os time machine command line



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